design: December 2010 Archives

275x250.jpg A design firm have re-imagined what a collection of famous brands would look like if they were given a minimalist makeover.

Gone are the garish labels full of brightly coloured images and over complicated text. In their place stunning typography... and very little else.

ANTREPO say the project was a test in simplicity and a comment about the unnecessary use of images, patterns and logos by many global brands.

Brands given the minimalism treatment include Red Bull, Corn Flakes, Nutella and Durex. They would have done the same with Apple… but then the packaging would have disappeared entirely.


subs belt saggy pantsMen wearing their jeans somewhere between their waist and knees, it's a trend which isn't going anywhere. Which is why an inventor has created a 'garter belt' for guys.

Andrew Lewis says his 'Subs' make the 'sagging' trend easier for men who struggle to keep the waist of their trousers where thy want.

Part suspenders and part garter belt, they are designed to keep jeans from falling down by suspending them from a waist loop.

The wearer can then control exactly how low the jeans hang by adjusting the fasteners -- all while knowing the won't fall down.

Oddly, the same reassurance that your trousers won't fall down can be achieved using an considerably older device… a tighter belt.

275x250.jpg The Mini is known for its pint-sized proportions - but for one mechanic it was still too big… because he wanted it to fit INSIDE his motor home.

As a result Lester Atherfold spent three months shortening his cherry red version of the 1964 Mini 850 from 10ft long to just 7ft 10ins.

That means the car - which still manages to reach speeds of 75mph - can now be transported in his AEC Reliance coach as he tours the world.

Speaking of his mini Mini, Atherfold said: "People often laugh at the car, especially young girls for some reason." 

Facebook map shows worldwide connections

facebook social connections map An intern at Facebook has used data from the social network to produce an amazing map of the world, visualising where friends live.

Paul Butler took a random sample of 10 million pairs of friends and plotted on a blank screen the city where they live, and the relative position of friends.

This means each line represents the number of friendships between cities and after tweaking the graphics Butler said it produced a "surprisingly detailed map of the world."

While big chunks of the world appear out of the data, down to costal and international borders, others are obviously missing such as China and central Africa… until they begin to like Facebook there too.




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