gadgets: November 2010 Archives

275x250.jpgBikes get stolen. Even when locked to a lamp posts -- but what if they where locked to a lamp post and raised 15ft off the ground?

That's the question a group of German inventors asked themselves shortly before creating a lamp post-climbing bike lock.

The team from German electronic components firm Conrad dreamt up the gizmo as part of a recent advertising campaign.

Made from motorised skateboard wheels, the device locks a cycle to a lamppost and then climbs 15ft up taking your bike out of the reach of crooks.

Bikers then simply press a button on a remote control to get their bike returned when they're ready to ride off… unless the battery has run out, or someone had locked their bike under yours.

275x250.jpg Most new mobile phones do all sorts of clever things like shoot HD video, access the internet and work as a sat-nav, but not all… meet the un-smartphone.

Hailed as the world's simplest phone, the £67 "John's Phone" is a "basic backlash" targeting users who don't want to check their Twitter feed or update Facebook.

In fact, all this phone does is make and receive calls, nothing else. There's no colour screen and the face features simply the numbers and a "Hello" and "Bye" buttons.

Well that's not entirely true, users can access an address book and play games… but these are in a paper book which slots into the rear.

275x250.jpgAn ultra-loud alarm clock has gone on sale which should wake most people up -- because it rings at a massive 90 decibels.

That means the Amplicom TCL 200 is as loud as a lorry driving past your bed or someone blowing a Vuvuzela on your bedside table. At 6:30am.

Makers say the ear-splitting alarm clock is designed for people who are deaf or hard of hearing, but could also be useful for incredibly deep sleepers.

If the noise isn't enough to wake you there are also bright flashing LEDs on the top, and if that won't do it, there's also a vibrating pad which can be tucked under your pillow.

All things considered this thing should wake you up… and probably your neighbours too. Even if they're dead.

275x250.jpgA bug in the iPhone operating system meant thousands of people were late for work today -- when their alarm clock went off an hour late.

While Apple iPhone 4 users saw their gadget automatically update when the clocks went back at the weekend, an apparent bug meant this did not synchronise with alarms.

As a result, people all across Europe who rely on their phone as an recurring alarm clock, found themselves waking up an hour later than expected.

Twitter was flooded with messages from disgruntled iPhone owners who'd had an unexpected lie-in.

iPhone users are now being advised to delete all recurring alarms and creating new alarm alerts… or just keep turning up late and using the same excuse.




Lijit Search
Related Posts with Thumbnails