geek: November 2010 Archives

275x250.jpgA seven-year-old girl has racked up a £250 bill for her parents -- after playing a game on their Facebook profile for just one hour.

Paramedic Mathew Fox, from Birmingham, says he was completely unaware daughter Megan was costing him a fortune as she played 'Petville'.

Mathew had let the youngster use his account to play the popular game because he does not think she's old enough to have an account of her own.

But as she bought virtual clothes and furniture for a colourful make-believe pet, he didn't know it was all being charged to his PayPal account.

That was until he received an spate of emails confirming the £250 virtual spending spree… we probably shouldn't repeat the status update he made shortly after.

275x250.jpg There are some pretty strange sights on Google Street View -- but a baby being born on the streets of Berlin isn't one of them.

This odd image did the rounds yesterday seemingly showing the Google car capturing the moment of birth on a street in the Wilmersdorf borough of the German city.

But all is not as it seems, Google have now confirmed the image is a fake and that real image taken of the street in question is a lot more mundane.

It's not known why the fake was created, but it's worth noting the building in the image is home to an advertising agency. Does this mean we can't believe everything we see on the internet?

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A photographer has stitched together 7,886 high-resolution images of London to create the world's largest 360-degree photo.

Jeffrey Martin says his 80 gigapixel panorama is so big it would measure 35m long and 17m tall if printed at normal photographic resolution.

It's said the images took three days to take, from the top of the 36 floor high Centre Point building at the crossroads of Oxford Street and Tottenham Court Road, using a DSLR camera with a 400mm lens.

Super-powerful computers were then required to put the images together and the results have been published online for you to zoom in and out of… and believe us, you won't be able to stop yourself.


275x250.jpg An artist and LEGO fan has created a remarkably accurate model of a frog dissection -- using nothing more than tiny bricks.

Teacher Dave Kaleta had been given the brief 'Lego anatomy' for a Lego building contest on the website mocpages.com.

Kaleta initially planned on using the topic Rembrandt’s Anatomy Lesson, but after chatting with a fellow teacher he decided a frog dissection was a more universal experience.

He then spent seven hours over three days producing the impressive anatomically correct model… which despite consisting solely of LEGO bricks still makes us feel a little queasy.




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