children: October 2010 Archives

275x250.jpgA gummy worm 128 times bigger than the usual sweet, measuring 26 inches long and packing 4,000 calories has gone on sale online.

The mega-sweet is identical to the two-tone ones you enjoyed as a child, but everything about it is bigger, including the £18 price.

With an impressive 5-inch girth the ribbed sweet contains 46 cubic inches of candy - that's the same as 128 regular gummy worms or 840 regular gummy bears.

The monster worm comes in a variety of flavours from pineapple and cherry to lemon and orange and each one contains almost double the recommended daily calorie intake.

Even makers of the world's largest Gummy worm agree it's not that healthy and don't advise eating it one sitting… though they do suggest carving it like a Christmas turkey. 

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The average ten-year-old has a collection of toys worth almost £7,000 - but plays with just £330 worth of them, it has been claimed.

A study quizzed 3,000 parents about their children's toys and found the typical one owns 238, but play with just 12 'favourites' on a daily basis.

This means kids are enjoying just five per cent of their toys -- and mom and dad have wasted a fortune on noisy bits of plastic.

It was also found parents think their children end up picking the same toys day in and day out because they have too many to choose from.

The poll also revealed 35% of construction toys such as Lego rarely get used… unless you include when Dad plays with it on his own.

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Hobbies such as stamp collecting, train spotting and model making are dying out, a study has revealed.

Researchers found the quintessential British pastimes are now considered 'boring' or 'for anoraks'.

Other hobbies which modern kids turn their noses up at include collecting marbles, completing jigsaws and constructing train sets.

Instead  youngsters now count 'watching television', 'playing computer games' or 'Facebooking', as their 'hobby'.

The trend emerged in a study of 1,000 adults and 1,000 children aged between 11 and 18… now we are not sure how they got the kids off Facebook for long enough to answer the question either.

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Boffins claim they've cracked the secret which will enable them to create Willy Wonka style sweets which replicate three meals in a single stick of gum.

Scientist Dave Hart, from the Institute of Food Research, says he can turn Roald Dahl’s eccentric gourmet gum invention into reality -- and luckily, without the unpleasant side effects!

Working with a team from the National Science & Engineering Competition he says nanotechnology can be used to encapsulate and release flavours in a precisely controlled way.

Hart and his team are currently experimenting with boiled sweets which have different flavour layers separated with a tasteless gelatine and contain a final desert taste at the centre, encapsulated in a high-tech gel called Gellan.

While he says a chewing gum might be a few years away, it he proclaims his boiled sweets a success -- and he hasn't even turned any children into blueberries, or so he says.

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This baby was born on a date to remember after arriving early on the tenth day, of the tenth month in the tenth year of the millennium… and at 10.10am and 10 seconds.

Little Niamh Bond couldn't wait any longer and was born eight weeks premature on what some have hailed as the luckiest day of the century.

The tiny tot weighed just 3lb 7oz when she was delivered at Good Hope Hospital, after her mom Keelie, 20, was rushed in on Saturday evening.

Niamh had not been due for another eight weeks -- but obviously thought it would be better to have a birthday no-one has an excuse for forgetting.

Proud Mum Keelie Hearne said she couldn't believe it when she realised the timing and was just glad her partner Dean Bond was there… yes, he arrived 10 minutes before Niamh was born.

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A worrying number of British kids reckon Buzz Lightyear was the first person to walk on the moon and 24's Jack Bauer blew up the Houses of Parliament.
 
The terrifying statistics emerged from a study of 2,000 schoolchildren where they were asked about key events in history and the people involved.
 
Twenty percent of kids believe Toy Story's Buzz Lightyear was the first person to set foot on the moon rather than Neil Armstrong while others thought it was Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong.

One in twenty thought Jack Bauer was behind the Gunpowder plot and a third didn't know Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone (9% said it was Deal or No Deal's Noel Edmonds).
 
It also emerged one in twenty thought Christopher Columbus discovered liposuction, NOT America, while one in ten wrongly believe Rolf Harris painted the Mona Lisa.

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Computer games where players control the action by swinging a remote control around are producing a unique brand of injuries, doctors claim.

Medics say using devices like the Nintendo Wii and the new Sony Playstation Move can lead to sprains in feet, shoulders and ankles.

Researchers from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia say there's a growing number of people admitted to hospital with games-console injuries each year.

But injuries are not limited to those overdoing it with their Wii -- many of the patients were to bystanders who had been clobbered by a swinging Wii-mote.

We are now wondering what game has caused the most injures. If you've come a cropper while Wii-ing let us know in the comments.




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