art: November 2010 Archives

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A pair of Dutch artists have completed an expedition to the North Pole to brink back a chunk of Arctic ice -- for you to buy and keep in your freezer.

Coralie Vogelaar and Teun Castelein wanted to highlight the impact of climate change so they did what anyone would, they shipped ice from a glacier to Amsterdam.

This was then chopped into 1,000 pieces which were placed in plastic containers and are currently on sale for £21 from a temppory store in Museum Square, Amsterdam, and can be reserved from mypolarice.com.

The duo say the nine inch transparent packaging will keep your ice frozen for three hours. So you'll need to decide quickly if you will be popping it in your freezer.. or the world'd most extravagant gin and tonic.

275x250.jpg A French photographer has transformed his 91-year-old granny into a spandex  and cape-wearing superhero for a stunning set of images.

Sacha Goldberger came up with the idea as a way of spending more time with his Hungarian-born grandmother who was showing signs of depression.

But the subsequent images -- which feature her scaling building and lifting cars --  have become an online hit and turned Frederika into something of a star.

Goldberger uses a mixture of studio techniques and photo manipulation to create the images… though we are assured she really was flying in the treadmill image.

275x250.jpg A designer has created a controversial piggy-bank made from a the body of a real piglet, which has gone on sale online for £2,500.

The Piglet Bank is the creation of Belfast designer Colin Hart and is made to order by a taxidermist using the body of a deceased baby pig.

The poor porker is hollowed out and has their insides replaced a coin storage unit. They then have a coin slot cut in their back and a hole with a cork bung in there belly for removing the cash.

But while Colin is keen to stress they only use piglets which have died of natural caused, that hasn't stopped animal rights protesters sending him death threats. We can't imagine why they'd be upset.

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A photographer has stitched together 7,886 high-resolution images of London to create the world's largest 360-degree photo.

Jeffrey Martin says his 80 gigapixel panorama is so big it would measure 35m long and 17m tall if printed at normal photographic resolution.

It's said the images took three days to take, from the top of the 36 floor high Centre Point building at the crossroads of Oxford Street and Tottenham Court Road, using a DSLR camera with a 400mm lens.

Super-powerful computers were then required to put the images together and the results have been published online for you to zoom in and out of… and believe us, you won't be able to stop yourself.


275x250.jpgAfter using 9,852 slices of toast to create a portrait of her mother-in-law for a 50th birthday present, Laura Hadland is at it again.

This time as a 'present' for her movie fan husband, artist Laura has created a Avatar Navi mosaic -- using 4,000 blu-ray discs.

Over several hours the discs of varying colours were placed on the floor to form the face of a Navi alien from the James Cameron blockbuster.

Laura then revealed the image to her husband, and as we haven't been told how impressed he was with it we're guessing it didn't go too well.

Actually, if you know Laura and have got a birthday coming up soon, you might want to ask her for a gift voucher… before she goes and buys 8,654 slices of bacon.

275x250.jpg An artist and LEGO fan has created a remarkably accurate model of a frog dissection -- using nothing more than tiny bricks.

Teacher Dave Kaleta had been given the brief 'Lego anatomy' for a Lego building contest on the website mocpages.com.

Kaleta initially planned on using the topic Rembrandt’s Anatomy Lesson, but after chatting with a fellow teacher he decided a frog dissection was a more universal experience.

He then spent seven hours over three days producing the impressive anatomically correct model… which despite consisting solely of LEGO bricks still makes us feel a little queasy.

275x250.jpg A British artist has created an amazing underwater sculpture museum in Mexico which consists of 400 statues of real people.

The underwater installation forms a new artificial reef at Cancun and Isla Mujeres National Marine Park and will become home for a variety of creatures.

Jason deCaires Taylor says it demonstrates the interaction between art and environmental science and special materials were used to promote coral life.

The 36-year-old from Kent used "life casts" to create the erie figures in 'The Silent Evolution Underwater Art Museum' which sit 10m underwater… and will scare the life out of any unsuspecting divers.

275x250.jpg A German artist yesterday set sail on the Thames, in an origami paper boat which he'd folded on the river bank.

Frank Bölter had created the boat -- named To The World's End -- with the help of members of the public as part of the Drift10 art exhibition.

After carefully folding the giant sheets of paper, which were reinforced with lightweight metal poles he jumped in and sailed in the Canary Wharf docks.

It's not known exactly how long he lasted, but he expected to sail for long enough to warrant taking a newspaper… unless he planned to use that as an emergency escape vessel.




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